Daylight Savings

Daylight Savings time is here.

Time to reorganize our clocks (unless you live in Arizona). Spring forward, fall back, and all that.  It’s time for that meme of an Indian commenting on how much sense it makes to cut a foot off one end of a blanket and sew it to the other end and think you get a bigger blanket.

Who’s fault is this temporal mess, anyway?

Canada started it. No really, in 1908, Ontario started using Daylight Savings Time. Other parts of Canada started playing along not too long after.

Germany, in 1916, was the first to do it country wide. The idea was to save fuel by reducing artificial lighting so the fuel could be used for the war that was going on right about then.

The idea was not entirely new to Canada and Germany. Many civilizations used different time measurement based on the month of the year to adjust for changes in the sunrise and sunset times.

New Zealander George Hudson proposed using the daylight savings in 1895, but it never caught on, and British builder William Willett proposed 8 time changes — 4 in April and the rest in October. Happily, that never caught on, either.

Woodrow Wilson has to take the blame for DST being used in the United States in 1918.

Really, though, with artificial light being so common these days, continuing DST seems a little silly

What do you think?

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2 thoughts on “Daylight Savings

  1. I agree with you. We almost missed Sunday School the next day because my clock, which was supposed to change automatically for DLS, didn’t. It is just a pain… and then my body has to get re-adjusted to my sleep cycle.

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